Posted 2 months ago

Space shuttle Atlantis, docked to the International Space Station, is featured in this image photographed by an STS-132 spacewalker during the mission’s first session of extravehicular activity (EVA).

(link)

Posted 2 months ago

pennyfornasa:

It’s been a long way, but we’re here.” - NASA Astronaut Alan Shepard 

While NASA has been sending American astronauts into space for over half a century, it all began with one - Alan Bartlett Shepard, Jr. An American test pilot, Shepard was selected as one of the first seven astronauts by the then newly formed National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Coined the ‘Mercury 7’, NASA’s first batch of carefully selected and trained individuals were to pilot the manned spaceflights of the Mercury program. In January 1961, Alan Shepard was selected from this group to pilot the Freedom 7 mission which would make him not only the first American in space, but the first human to reach this threshold. 

Unfortunately, due to delays by unplanned preparatory work, the flight was postponed nearly seven months after the initial planned date. In this time, more specifically less than a month prior to Shepard’s flight, Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin would leapfrog Shepard to become the first person in space and to orbit the Earth. On May 5, 1961, Shepard piloted the Freedom 7 mission and became the second person, and the first American, to travel into space.

Following his involvement with Mercury and Gemini, Shepard would command America’s third successful lunar landing mission - Apollo 14. The first mission to successfully broadcast color television pictures from the surface of the Moon, Shepard piloted the Lunar Module Antares to the most accurate landing of the entire Apollo program.

On July 21st 1998, at the age of 74, Alan Shepard succumbed to leukemia.

Celebrate the career of Alan Shepard by writing to Congress to let them know you support doubling funding for NASA: http://www.penny4nasa.org/take-action/

To read more:
http://goo.gl/QnZ6tj
http://goo.gl/aaqsrv
http://goo.gl/EIn4Iq

Posted 2 months ago
Posted 2 months ago

canadian-space-agency:

"One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind."

It was 45 years ago today, on July 21 1969, that man landed and walked on the Moon for the first time!

Simply amazing!

Credit: NASA

Posted 2 months ago

humanoidhistory:

July 20, 1969 — A view of the southwestern Sea of Tranquility seen from the Apollo 11 lunar module while in orbit. (NASA)

Posted 2 months ago

pennyfornasa:

While today may belong to the 45th anniversary of the Apollo 11 lunar landing, it’s important not to forget another important anniversary for NASA - the landing of the Viking 1 spacecraft on Mars!

On July 20th, 1976, the Viking 1 lander separated from the orbiter and touched down at Chryse Planitia, a flat lowland region in the northern hemisphere of Mars. Immediately following touchdown, the lander made history by taking and transmitting the first complete photograph taken from the surface of Mars. The image (http://goo.gl/6C5L6m) was of the Viking 1 lander’s foot as an indication of how far it had sunk into the Martian surface. Between itself and its companion, Viking 2, this historic photograph was just the first of more than 50,000 images taken from the Martian surface, as well as from orbit, and transmitted back to Earth.

What makes Viking 1 especially worth noting is that it was not only the first attempt by the United States at landing on Mars, but it was also the first spacecraft to successfully do so and perform its mission. While the Soviet Mars 3 mission was the first to achieve a soft landing of a spacecraft on Mars it stopped transmitting data 15 seconds after landing. During those few seconds of transmission, it sent the first partial photograph taken from the surface of Mars although nothing was identifiable in it.

During its operation on the Martian surface, Viking 1 became the record holder for longest Mars surface mission at 2307 days, until Mars Rover Opportunity took the record in 2010.

To read more about Viking 1:
http://goo.gl/NOxjpM
http://goo.gl/iKPlJ6
http://goo.gl/6klaq9

Posted 2 months ago

pennyfornasa:

"That’s one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind."

Right now, 45 years ago, Neil Armstrong becomes the first human to set foot on the Moon.

Posted 2 months ago

historysisco:

On this day in history June 20, 1969: At 10:56 p.m. EDT, American astronaut Neil Armstrong, 240,000 miles from Earth, speaks these words to more than a billion people listening at home: “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.” Stepping off the lunar landing module Eagle, Armstrong became the first human to walk on the surface of the moon.

Posted 2 months ago

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Wingtip vortices are a result of the finite length of a wing. Airplanes generate lift by having low-pressure air travelling over the top of the wing and higher pressure air along the bottom. If the wing were infinite, the two flows would remain separate. Instead, the high-pressure air from under the wing sneaks around the wingtip to reach the lower pressure region. This creates the vorticity that trails behind the aircraft. I was first introduced to the concept of wingtip vortices in my junior year during introductory fluid dynamics. As I recall, the concept was utterly bizarre and so difficult to wrap our heads around that everyone, including the TA, had trouble figuring out which way the vortices were supposed to spin. A few good photos and videos would have helped, I’m sure. (Photo credits: U.S. Coast Guard, S. Morris, Nat. Geo/BBC2)

Posted 2 months ago

spaceexp:

How big is Rosetta compared with the comet?